No time like the present (Luke 16:1-13)

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This seemingly bewildering parable addresses questions concerning eternity, money & possessions.

Although this parable is perplexing at times, it helps to remember that parables are truths wrapped in story form. There is normally a single truth or big idea that’s being communicated…

Just as in the secular parable about the boy crying “wolf”, the detail (where he was, what he was wearing….) is not essential, the big idea is.  So to this is helpful in understanding parables…

So what is the big idea?
I think there are two in this story:
1) We are managers/stewards and not owners.
2) This life is a test that impacts eternity

We are stewards not owners
This changes everything! “Our money” is not our money after all, and so we are not free to use money as we choose but rather need to consider the wishes of God who owns all things including the money held in our trust for Him.

This life is a test that affects eternity
We are managers/stewards of God’s resources (time, money, skills….) and we should use those resources wisely while we still can, to effect eternity.

The manager in this parable knows that his days as manager are about to end, and so he does what he can while he still can to effect his future and Jesus calls this shrewd or wise.

He knows that he is about to loose his job, loose control of the wealth of the owner, but he still has this moment in the present while still manager that can affect his future.

This is what he is commended for, having a future perspective that changed his life now in the present, changed his actions now.

In the same way, one thing is certain for all of us, at an hour unknown we will be ‘dismissed’ from his present realm into eternity.

Just like the manager who had limited time before his dismissal, we too can only effect eternity in the present and so we are wise to use what God has entrusted to us now in such a way that impacts our eternity positively.

“One who is faithful in a very little is also faithful in much, and one who is dishonest in a very little is also dishonest in much. If then you have not been faithful in the unrighteous wealth, who will entrust to you the true riches? And if you have not been faithful in that which is another’s, who will give you that which is your own? No servant can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money.”

This life is a test in that our faithfulness as stewards of God’s resources now will determine what God entrusts to us eternally.

The thing with this test is we don’t know when the trumpet will sound and all pens will have to be put down… In that moment nothing else will be able to be done, how we lived will then determine eternal reward (2 Corinthians 5:10).

Matthew Henry said; ‘live everyday as if it were your last day’. There’s no time like the present to live as a good, wise manager of God’s resources.

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Living in light of eternity (Luke 14:12-14)

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12  He said also to the man who had invited him, “When you give a dinner or a banquet, do not invite your friends or your brothers or your relatives or rich neighbors, lest they also invite you in return and you be repaid. 13  But when you give a feast, invite the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind, 14  and you will be blessed, because they cannot repay you. You will be repaid at the resurrection of the just.” (Luke 14:12-14)

This parable is brought on by Jesus’ healing of the blind man on the sabbath at the feast put on by the Pharisee.  It follows Jesus’ parable teaching humility to the guests of the host.  Now in this parable Jesus focusses on the host and reveals the motivation in the heart of the host for why he invited those he did invite to his feast.  The initial two verses (12-14) are then followed by a parable which reveals God’s heart regarding whom God is inviting to His salvation banquet.

The compatibility principle:

Jesus’ teachings in Matthew 6:19-21 concerning how we ought to live for eternity, focussing on storing up treasures in heaven (which is lasting) rather than the temporary and fading treasures of this present life and world.

As believers we will all appear before God’s rewards seat (see 1 Corinthians 5:9-10) to receive what is due to us “for what he has done in the body whether good or evil”.  We are saved by grace, this is a reward ceremony but not everything will be rewarded.  How we live now really matters and will have an effect on eternity.  We ought to live every day in light of the reality of eternity.

Moses lived like this as we know from Hebrews 11:24-26.  His focus on eternity and his reward in eternity impacted his choices, strengthened his resolve to resist the temptations of sin knowing that sin’s offer of pleasure is fleeting but godliness will lead to pleasure & joy that is eternal.

What questions does it address, ask or answer?

What motivates our actions?  This first part of the total parable addresses the issue of not just of who we invite to what, but why we do the things we do.  These verses 12-14 address the issue of the motivation behind our actions.

These verses also bring the fore the issue of eternity and the relative value of the present compared to the supreme value of eternity.

What tension does this text create or resolve?

There is a tension in these verses between the outlook that considers only the present but ignores eternity and the outlook that lives a certain way now because of eternity.

When we see how much grace and mercy and generosity God has poured into our lives we the reasonable response is to love God and love people with the self-same love we have received from God.  And knowing that God will reward a godly response to His grace in our lives should motivate us to respond to His grace by living in light of eternity to come.

What mystery does this text speak to?

This parable speaks to the mystery of eternity, eternal life after death.  It raises the question what happens when we die?  Do how we live our lives on earth matter?  It speaks about the issue of rewards in heaven.

What happens when we die is;

“it is appointed for man to die once, and after that comes judgement” (Hebrews 9:27).

There is judgement for all after death, judgement for salvation – “Is your name in the Lamb’s book of life?” and then judgement for works how you responded to the grace of God in giving you salvation – “How did you live as a child of God?”

The first judgement is only passed by those who believed in Jesus (John 5:24) while still alive and received eternal life as God’s gracious gift.  The second judgement for the believer is not by grace but about the “good works God had planned for us to do” (Ephesians 2:10) having been saved by His grace.

The following passages all speak about rewards for the believer:

Romans 14:12, 1 Corinthians 3:12-15, 2 Corinthians 5:10, Luke 14:12-14, Matthew 6:19-21,Revelation 11:18, Revelation 20:12, Revelation 22:12…

What issues in life does this text address?

Do we see people, do we value people as God values all people?

If we act in such a way as to advance ourselves, bless ourselves through using our time, money, possessions or hospitality we in fact are not blessed.  But if we use our resources to bless others, without the aim being to “get something in return” we then are blessed not by people but by God (“you will be blessed”).

If we seek to be a blessing, especially being mindful of those who are marginalized, God will bless us.  Those marginalized people will not be able to “return the favours” but God will repay you with blessing now and reward on the day of judgement into eternity.

When last did I show hospitality to the marginalized?  Not just inviting people round for meals hoping I would receive friendship in return, or that they would like me or think I am great….

How can I serve those who cannot pay me back?  How can I give of my time, my money, my resources to those who will never return it?

How can I be like God today – giving lavishly of Himself to those (us) who could never repay Him?

What does this text say about God, myself or others?

God wants me to be like Him, who gave to those who could never repay Him.  God is full of lavish grace, free mercy towards those who don’t deserve it and can never reciprocate so as to repay Him.

God rewards (“you will be repaid at the resurrection of the just”) those who are like Him in this life with their time, possessions and money.

God’s heart is inclined towards the poor, the hurting, the marginalized – He cares that we care for such people in such situations.  God affords honour to the marginalized.

Application

Godliness is the antithesis of selfishness.  Godliness will result in blessing others and especially blessing those who can not or will not return the blessing.

Seek to be like God, giving, blessing with no regard for what you can get back, but rather seeking to be like God, to reveal God’s love to others.

You will be blessed Jesus said and you will be rewarded in the realm that ultimately matters – eternity.

Humility

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7 Now he told a parable to those who were invited, when he noticed how they chose the places of honor, saying to them, 8 “When you are invited by someone to a wedding feast, do not sit down in a place of honor, lest someone more distinguished than you be invited by him, 9 and he who invited you both will come and say to you, ‘Give your place to this person,’ and then you will begin with shame to take the lowest place. 10 But when you are invited, go and sit in the lowest place, so that when your host comes he may say to you, ‘Friend, move up higher.’ Then you will be honored in the presence of all who sit at table with you. 11 For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted.” (Luke 14:7-11)

Literary Context

Just preceding this is the healing of the man on the Sabbath by Jesus while Jesus was a guest of one of the Pharisees homes.  They were more concerned about Sabbath observance than about the person (the man with dropsy who gets healed).

Jesus has noticed something about how they arranged themselves at the feast, Jesus had noticed how they chose for themselves places of honour…

So this parable was then told by Jesus to those who were invited to the feast.

The compatibility principle

Right after this parable Jesus speaks a parable to the man who had invited Him.

The historical narrative of the last supper can also be compared to these two feasts.  That supper was one where Jesus humbled Himself and modelled true leadership to us.

It is also noted that we who believe in Jesus ultimately get invited to the wedding supper of the Lamb at the end of this age and the beginning of the next.

This passage is also linked to the other teachings on humility:

Good and upright is the LORD; therefore he instructs sinners in the way. 9 He leads the humble in what is right, and teaches the humble his way. (Psalms 25:8-9)

Great is our Lord, and abundant in power; his understanding is beyond measure. 6 The LORD lifts up the humble; he casts the wicked to the ground. 7 Sing to the LORD with thanksgiving; make melody to our God on the lyre! (Psalm 147:5-7)

For the LORD takes pleasure in his people; he adorns the humble with salvation. (Psalms 149:4)

When pride comes, then comes disgrace, but with the humble is wisdom. (Proverbs 11:2)

Thus says the LORD: Heaven is my throne, and the earth is my footstool; what is the house that you would build for me, and what is the place of my rest? 2 All these things my hand has made, and so all these things came to be, declares the LORD. But this is the one to whom I will look: he who is humble and contrite in spirit and trembles at my word. Isaiah 66:1-2

Philippians 2:5-11 – Jesus’ example of humility

Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, 6  who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, 7  but made himself nothing, taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. 8  And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. 9  Therefore God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name that is above every name, 10  so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, 11  and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father. 

Likewise, you who are younger, be subject to the elders. Clothe yourselves, all of you, with humility toward one another, for “God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble.” 6  Humble yourselves, therefore, under the mighty hand of God so that at the proper time he may exalt you, 7  casting all your anxieties on him, because he cares for you. 8  Be sober-minded; be watchful. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour. Peter 5:5: Likewise, you who are younger, be subject to the elders. Clothe yourselves, all of you, with humility toward one another, for God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble. (I Peter 5:5-8)

James 4:10: Humble yourselves before the Lord, and he will exalt you. 

What questions does it address, ask or answer?

This passages deals with the issues of humility and pride and the wisdom/foolishness of taking honour rather than having it given to you.

Honour is best given rather than taken because “everyone who exalts himself will be humbled.” (Luke 14:11)

The big idea when reading through the various passages on humility is that we ought to humble ourselves and let God exalt, let God honour us in His time.

  • God leads and teaches those who are humble – Psalm 25
  • God lifts up the humble but brings to nothing the proud – Psalm 147
  • God adorns the humble with salvation – Psalm 149
  • Humility leads to wisdom, pride leads to disgrace – Proverbs 11:2
  • Humility is more valuable to God who made everything than anything else! – Isaiah 66:1-2
  • Have this in mind – Jesus humbled Himself and so God exalted Him! – Philippians 2:5-11
  • Put on humility, humble yourself so that God might exalt you at the proper time – 1 Peter 5
  • God gives grace to the humble but opposes the proud – 1 Peter 5

The humble person will be adorned with salvation, lead, taught, lifted up, given wisdom, valued and will receive grace from God.  The humble person will be like Jesus!

Honour is not taken but given.  Salvation requires humility in that we have to acknowledge our sin and our need of being saved.  And having been saved by God we ought always to be mindful of how we were saved.

Pride in the believer is an antithesis.  Compared to God’s majesty, power, holiness we are not in a position to have anything other than humility.  Considering our own sinful state and fallenness we really don’t have anything to be proud about.

We have not been treated by Almighty God as our sins deserved, we have been shown mercy and grace, we have been forgiven and set free from the entanglements of our own sin, we are recipients of grace, humble servants of our wonderful King of love.

The paradox is that because God loved us in spite of our fallenness, we have had the greatest honour bestowed on us, we have been so valued by God that He was die for us in our place and to crown us with salvation.

Although we are to be humble, we are honoured by God in the most remarkable way and given a position of honour within His creation for all eternity, not because we are good but because He is good, not because of what we did but because of what He did for us.

So worship God who bestows honour and glory on those who didn’t deserve it but received it through Jesus Christ.  To Him be the honour and glory forever and ever amen.

Application

The humble person will be adorned with salvation, lead, taught, lifted up, given wisdom, valued and will receive grace from God.  Scripture contrasts this positive outlook to the bleak outlook of the proud person who is opposed by God and who will be humbled by God…

Do you know Jesus as your Lord and Saviour?  Have you humbled yourself yet before God, acknowledged that self-salvation, reliance on self and human effort will ultimately fail, it will fall short of the requirements of God?

If not, then know today that receiving honour that lasts for eternity starts with humbling oneself, confessing that you are flawed and sinful, hopeless outside of God and God’s help.  Receiving honour starts with asking Jesus to be your Saviour, asking Him to forgive you from your sin and letting Him set you free from sin, shame, bondage and death.

The moment you do this, you get honoured by God, you get the privilege of becoming the child of God (John 1:12).

Are you a believer?  Then consider again your salvation.  Do you have anything to boast in (Ephesians 2:4-10)?  What do you have that you have not received from God as a gift?

The appropriate heart condition for the believer is humility & thankfulness giving honour and praise to the source (God) of all that you have received from Him.

Is there any situation in which you have sort to honour yourself?  Remember Jesus’ words; “For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted.” (Luke 14:7-11)

God’s love poured into our hearts (Romans 5:5)

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“God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit

who has been given to us.”  (Romans 5:5)

How do you feel God’s love? (My Facebook post 17/06/2013)

We know God loves us, but do you feel it?  My kids know I love them but when I hug them they experience that knowledge tangibly.

Romans 5:6 says; “God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us.”

Don’t you love the chosen adjective here? God’s love has been “poured” into our hearts, gushed into, spilled over into are the other potential translations…  The measure here is abundance not measured. God abundantly gives us an experience of his love by the Holy Spirit.

No wonder Paul encourages us to be continually filled with the Holy Spirit (Ephesians 5:18) as this results in us knowing God loves me this I know for through the Holy Spirit I feel it so…

Jane Hampton (Facebook comment on my post 17/06/2013) That’s my prayer for those I love who are battling with His reality – that He would pour His love into their hearts by His Holy Spirit so they know His love and presence. But I don’t know how?

Oh, how I want answers to this pastoral question.  Now I know no Greek, but I am equipped with some resources to delve into the Greek and I am confident that Scripture is true, and therefore true for all people.

On reflection I felt drawn to the verb “poured” and it’s tenses and discovered that this verb is in the perfect, passive, indicative, 3rd person!  Feels like I have dipped my foot into a pool that’s way too deep for me…

But having read up on this my summary is that this verb “poured” used to describe God’s action towards us concerning His love this is what I have discovered;

It’s happened already!  God’s love was poured into our hearts.  The perfect tense describes a completed action, that occurred in the past but which produced a state of being or a result that exists in the present.

It’s not up to us!  The verb poured is also in the passive and third person tenses.  What this means is that God is the active person, we are being acted upon; we are those who are receiving this love that is  poured out by God.  We don’t have to work for it, do anything for it.

It is real!  Finally the verb is also in the indicative tense which means that – according to the writer what is being described as happening is real, it is not just a feeling, it is actual not just possible.

Putting it all together now…  In what way has God’s love been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us?  Verse 6 gives us the answer – Jesus’ dying for us on the cross is how God’s love has been perfectly poured out by Him for us in a real way so that we really receive the actual love of God.

What must we do?  How do we feel this love?  Firstly let’s acknowledge that the word study here reveals that we can’t strive to have God’s love poured into our hearts!  It is His action that’s being described, an action, an event that has already happened, which is real (not just a feeling) and is not up to us at all.

So what can we do?  I believe that we are to meditate on the finished work of Christ on the cross which is the demonstration of God’s love for us.  We know God loves us, because the Holy Spirit tells us that God died for us in our place because He loved us enough to give Himself for us so that we could be with Him forever.  The cross is the epicenter of God’s love and when we feel His love tangibly now today, what we are feeling are the ongoing shockwaves of that real event that is at the centre of all history and the one on which we should centre our lives as well.

Children matter, as do lost people…

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Text: Matthew 18:10-14

Historical Context

This parable is placed just after Peter’s confession that Jesus is the Christ, the Messiah and then also just after the transfiguration of Jesus in the presence of Peter, James and John.

Literary Context

Jesus is speaking to the disciples (18:1), they have just asked Him the question; “Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven?”  Jesus’ reply starts with an action; he invites a child to come and stand with Him…

Then Jesus answers their question by telling them they need to become like this child to enter the kingdom – you have to humble yourself.  Jesus also gives real value to this child saying that to receive a child is to receive Jesus and to lead a child to sin is grave danger before God…

Jesus then warns them of the seriousness of sin and the fearful judgement to come on sin, and so urges these disciples to take drastic action regarding dealing with sin.

Then we have Jesus parable of the lost sheep which comes back to the value in God’s eyes of each person, in each child even.

The compatibility principle (compare to other Scripture)

This parable is not the same as the one found in Luke 15 with a similar theme, the context is different.  This parable was told to the disciples, that one was directed at the Pharisees in the presence of tax collectors and sinners who were drawing near to Jesus.

Content (who, why, what, how, when, for what….?)

What questions does it address, ask or answer?

This parable speaks to the value of children

Jesus warns the disciples to not despise, to not think little of these children (vs10).  God does not discriminate on age, all people have equal value before God.  They had asked who’s the greatest and Jesus’ response is for the disciples to see the value (as God does) of these children that are so precious to Him.

Application: Lord please help me to “see” the children you have placed around me and to value them as you do!  Not just my own, but to value all children.

This parable answers the question; ‘Is there a heaven?’

Heaven is just spoken of as an accepted fact, Matthew as a gospel was evangelistic and aimed at fellow Jews, so heaven is not even argued for but assumed.  Jesus however does challenge any false idea that God was somehow like the royalty of the day who would have had little time for children and challenge any idea that God was somehow disinterested in sections of the population (those marginalised people like the sick, the outcast, the sinner, the women and children, the gentile, the slave…).

God is mindful of the lowly, of children who are ever before Him in that the angels ministering to them (Hebrews 1:14) are always before God.  Our God is accessible always to all who approach through His appointed mediator – Jesus (1 Timothy 2:5)

Angels!

In his commentary Michael Green mentions the fact that angelology was highly developed in that day with common belief that nations, churches, individuals had angels representing them before God.  At this point in his gospel Matthew does not teach against this belief but uses it to make a point about God – that he is attentive to the lives of children continuously.

From the perspective of the whole of Scripture there are two errors that can be made regarding our understanding of angels; to disregard them entirely or to give them too much attention.  Jesus is our one mediator and yet Scripture is clear that angels are ministering spirits serving those who are the elect.

Application:  Know that in addition to the continuous presence of the Holy Spirit (Hebrews 13:5) God has sent angels to minister to you if you have believed in Jesus.  Ask God to reveal to you (when you face danger or trial) His armies of angels that are with you (2 Kings 6:15-18) as Elisha prayed Ghazi would see.

This parable tells us something about God’s nature

God’s nature is to seek out the stray, to pursue the one who is lost.  God takes responsibility for keeping us in close proximity with Him and with the rest of the flock!

Application: How often do we not preach from the other perspective ignoring this clear teaching by Jesus that God personally is committed to finding us when we go astray.  What good news, what assurance flows from this knowledge that our lives are ever before God and if we stray He Himself goes out in search of us to bring us back into proximity with Him and the rest of the flock.

This parable tells us something of Jesus’ relationship with God

Jesus describes His relationship with God when He says; “my Father who is in heaven.”  The literary context informs us that this statement is after Peter’s revelation that Jesus is the Christ, the promised Messiah and after Peter, James and John’s experience at the transfiguration of Jesus.

Jesus – who is God, Messiah is also a son.  God the son has a relationship with God the Father who is in heaven.  This therefore is a partial trinitarian passage referring to two of the members of the Godhead and describing the relationship as a Father/Son relationship.

Jesus’ heart was the same as the heart of the Father expressed here in this parable when He said elsewhere to Zacchaeus; “For the Son of Man came to seek and save the lost” (Luke 19:10).  Just as the Father’s heart was for the lost, the stray – so too was this Jesus’ heart.

Application: Is my heart concerned about any who know God who have gone astray?  Is my heart concerned about children or anyone who have not come to faith in Jesus for their salvation?  Does it concern me like it concerns God?

This parable tells us something of what God’s will is that no children perish 

God’s will is that none (we are all children so it applies to children and beyond) should perish in hell (in hell is understood from the context of Matthew 18:9).  So God has made a way through faith in Jesus’s finished work and His offer of forgiveness for our sins and His perfect righteousness for those who are not perfect but decidedly flawed!

I have a, we have a responsibility to be like our heavenly Father and Jesus who’s passion was that all accept the offer of salvation He gives.

Hearing precedes obeying

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If one wants to hear “well done” on That Day we need to hear God today – so that we can obey.

If my children don’t hear me they can’t obey what I have asked of them.

Yet many, including myself, will testify that at times they battle to hear God’s voice.

Just the other day I sat with a man in my offfice who needed to hear God for a workplace decision, last weekend good friends needed to hear God’s guiding voice again to make a decision about their future and that of the church, just today a young woman I know asked for prayer that she’d be able to hear from God and that He would guide me in the direction He wants me…

And yet in John 10 Jesus has an expectation that those who are His will not only hear His voice but will know it, recognise it as His.

John 10:3-4 & 27 ESV
…The sheep hear his voice, and he calls his own sheep by name and leads them out. (4) When he has brought out all his own, he goes before them, and the sheep follow him, for they know his voice…(27)My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me.

So what do we do when our experience doesn’t line up with the clear reading & interpretation of Scripture?

Two options present themselves:
1) Alter our interpretation of Scripture to fit our experience or
2) Believe Scripture and so pray for our experience to change.

God does speak, I believe He’s speaking all the time, so why not start today by deciding in your heart that you are desiring to hear God your Father so that you can obey, why not start praying daily that you’d recognise His voice.

God speaks in many varied ways (creation, Scripture, other people, a peace or unease in our spirit or conscience, through something that happens or something we experience, through something written, sung, painted…) how exciting to go into every day with a sense of anticipation knowing your Father is speaking, you just need to discover & discern His voice!

Do you find your default, when you think you might have heard God, is to disbelieve that it was God?

If you believe God your Father wants to speak to you in everyday life, why not decide now to err on the side of belief rather than unbelief. Next time you feel like God’s speaking, why not believe that He is?

Hearing God, is essential for daily living, we need to get out of the bad habit of only seeking God, trying to hear God when facing big life decisions. If developed a practice of hearing God in the daily little things, we’d surely find it easier to recognise and therefore hear God’s voice in the big moments of life.

Join me in this adventure of hearing God & obeying what He says, not doing more than He told us to, not doing less but obeying quickly.

Imagine that life… It’s your inheritance as the child of God.

Lazarus – a picture of the saved yet stuck believer (John 11:44)

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When he had said these things, he cried out with a loud voice, “Lazarus, come out.” 44  The man who had died came out, his hands and feet bound with linen strips, and his face wrapped with a cloth. Jesus said to them, “Unbind him, and let him go.”
 
Lazarus here reminds me of salvation, he is raised to new life but comes out looking more like an Egyptian mummy than a person!  He is still bound up, unable to move, see or talk freely…  Jesus doesn’t just raise him to new life though, Jesus says to those watching on in amazement, unbind him, and let him go.

This for me is a picture of the total salvation that Jesus purchased for us on the cross.  It would have been ridiculous for Lazarus, having been given new life to keep his grave clothes on!  Yes he has been given new life but he needs those things taken off to really allow him to enjoy his new life.

Lazarus is a picture here for me of someone who is saved yet stuck.  Stuck with the things that weigh us down, the things that hinder us and the sin that entangles us (Hebrews 12:1-2),  restricting our freedom in Christ.  Jesus’ concern is for Lazarus to be totally free (Luke 4:18-19) and so he said to…
Interestingly Jesus does not tell Lazarus to unbind himself.  I presume that’s because he was so wrapped up that he couldn’t help himself free.  So Jesus tells those around Lazarus to unbind him and to let him go, let him be truly free.
We need others to help us walk into our own freedom in Christ, Jesus raises us from the grave of sin and shame, Jesus gives new life and Jesus’ desire is for us to walk in total freedom – and yet we need others to unbind us so that we can enter into our freedom that is in Christ.
  1. In what ways am I saved but stuck?
  2. Do I have grave clothes still restricting my freedom that was given to me in Christ?
  3. Who in my life right now has Jesus said to me; “Unbind them and let them go”?
  4. How do we unbind people (get them unstuck)?