Leadership

Confidence in Challenges (1 Timothy 1:18-20)

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As 1 Timothy 1 draws to a close, lets imagine being Timothy for a moment.

He was a young man who was given an intimidating mission. He had to challenge and oppose existing leaders with no assurance of how they will respond. Paul calls Timothy to “wage good warfare”, which suggests that he will experience trials, opposition, and sacrifice. Paul states that he is on mission to another place, so there is no backup to call upon. Finally, in 2 Timothy 1 we see Paul encouraging Timothy to not be shy or ashamed of the gospel; an encouragement only needed if Timothy was feeling the pressure of his charge. In light of all of this, perhaps we can understand if there was any trepidation in Timothy.

However Paul provides some wonderfully encouraging reasons for Timothy to be of good courage as he steps onto the frontline. Lets look at them together, and draw fresh confidence in the midst of our own challenges:

  • Paul trusted Timothy

As Timothy fought on battleground of gospel advance, he would have read the words “… I entrusted to you…” and I’m sure it would have brought instant assurance. Assurance that would have strengthened him to persevere, because the one who knew him the most had entrusted him. Paul writes affectionately of their intimate relationship, and he also writes of the confidence he has in Timothy to carry out this task. I’m certain this vote of confidence would have warmed his heart and strengthened his resolve.

  • Timothy could rest on prophesies

After this statement of fatherly trust, Paul then reminds Timothy that God has already spoken and equipped him for the mission he was on. Clearly Timothy had received prophetic words at a young age, and Paul says that the mission Timothy had in Ephesus fitted the words that God had previously given him. God was guiding Timothy, empowering and encouraging him into church leadership, and Paul was reminding Timothy of the great assurance this brings. As someone who also received prophetic words at a young age, I feel that I can emphasize and speak for Timothy when I say that prophetic words can excite and energize us to attempt things on the mission field that we know are beyond ourselves. God has intervened – God has spoken – God’s power is inside us! We will not falter and His purposes will be accomplished!

  • Timothy already experienced gospel power himself

Finally, Paul references the ‘faith’ and ‘good conscience’ that he first states in verse 5. The purpose of the repetition is to remind Timothy that he has already experienced the awe-inspiring power of Gospel transformation! This transformation produces attributes in us that wouldn’t otherwise be there, and this is God equipping us for what He has called us to. Timothy’s faith and conscience is proof of God’s Spirit working in Him, and Paul says, “by them you may wage the good warfare.”

One of the many, many reasons I find Jesus compelling is that Jesus doesn’t sell us an unrealistic view of life. He clearly prepares us for the various challenges we face in a fallen world, and for Timothy this looked like arrogant teachers shipwrecking their own faith and causing others to wander away from gospel truth. However God, through the words of Paul, provides various sources of encouragement that increases our confidence and empowers us to face our challenges head on.

SOME QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER:

  1. What mission / purpose has God given you in your current season of life?
  2. What challenges are you going through right now as you try to live out this mission?
  3. How does the gospel truth found in Paul’s words build confidence in you?
  4. From this passage, what do you think is the purpose of God encouraging you to greater confidence?

LEADERSHIP NOTE:

Paul doesn’t boost Timothy’s confidence by talking about his qualities and strengths. Fresh from recounting his own unimpressive and humbling testimony, Paul only speaks of what has happened to Timothy. God has given Timothy a loving father figure to mentor him, prophetic words to guide him and gospel transformation to empower him. Confident leaders are NOT confident in themselves. Confident leaders are confident because DESPITE of themselves, God is gracefully working through them for His great glory.

Gospel Transformation (1 Timothy 1:12-20)

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You are much, much worse than you think you are.

Of all the things that Paul talks about here, perhaps one of the most surprising is to see how he considers himself. In a direct contrast to the proud and arrogant false teachers waging war on the church in Ephesus, Paul recounts how undeserved his salvation is, and exposes the very worst parts of himself to everyone who reads 1 Timothy 1.

We know Paul’s background as a Pharisee who persecuted and murdered Christians. Which is why verse 13 is no surprise to us. Paul really was a blasphemer, a persecutor and an insolent opponent. It is perhaps understandable why Paul views himself as “the chief/foremost of sinners” in verse 15. He did do terrible things.

However Paul isn’t just talking about his past. In verse 15 Paul says “… I am the foremost…” where he is using the present tense. There are similar accounts in the bible where Paul exposes his unworthiness of Gods love, such “For I am the least of the apostles”[1] or “though I am the very least of the saints.”[2] These are all present tense statements, and they are so surprising! This is the super apostle Paul. This is the Damascus road guy! This is the church planter extraordinaire!

Paul is demonstrating a raw and vulnerable leadership that contrasts so heavily from other leaders. There is beauty in his humbled heart, his lack of ego, and his great desire that Jesus is ‘displayed’ through his ‘example’.[3] Paul hasn’t developed an ego, he has developed a correct understand of how far away he was from God, before God intervened with his mercy.[4] Paul was much worse than he ever thought possible, and God changed that to show the gospel’s power to transform the very worst of us.

Aren’t you utterly amazed, that even though you are (present tense) much worse than you ever thought, Gods arm was not too short to save you, and isn’t too short to preserve you now. Instead the grace of God overflows for us (verse 14) that Jesus would be displayed to those who will come to believe (verse 16).

SOME QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER:

  1. As Paul got older, his conviction over his sin grew. Evaluate your life and ask if the same is true for you?
  2. How does an accurate view of our sin help to display Jesus?
  3. Why do you think Paul was willing to bear such a heavy cost so Jesus could be displayed?

LEADERSHIP NOTE:    

Paul’s purpose for recalling his story was so that Jesus might be displayed. Paul was willing to take the cost of appearing unimpressive if it advanced the Gospel. He leverages his story for the sake of the lost. Leadership is all about sacrifice, leaving everything behind and taking every opportunity to make Jesus known.


[1] 1 Corinthians 15:9

[2] Ephesians 3:8

[3] 1 Timothy 1:16

[4] 1 Timothy 1:13 & 16

Leadership Expectations (1 Thessalonians 2:5-9)

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What’s appropriate behaviour & motivation for church leaders?

Sadly we live in an age of celebrity leaders spurred on by the power of media such as television, books, audio, podcasts, vodcasts & social media.  With this notoriety comes the potential pitfalls of financial gain, aloofness, opulence, self-serving agendas or teachings…

We already know from 1Thessalonians 2:4 that Paul and his team as leaders in God’s church, were motivated by pleasing God, and not by trying to people-please.  Now in verses 5-10 we discover that these leaders were also not self-pleasing but rather self-sacrificial in nature.

They did not flatter people so as to manipulate them for their own advancement.  They did not have a motive of greed or financial gain, and they did not seek their own fame and glory, or the adulation from people.  Paul writes how God is their witness in these things…

Rather as godly leaders in this context they were;

  • Gentle: they didn’t wield their authority but gently appealed to people’s consciences (2 Corinthians 4:2) as they lead them. (vs7)
  • Caring: they loved sacrificially like a mother, caring always for those they’d been charged by God to lead by serving. (vs7)
  • Authentic: they didn’t just share their words/ideas but shared their whole lives with those they lead.  They lived revealed, transparent accountable lives with those they lead. (vs8)
  • Sacrificial: they were bi-vocational, preaching while also working to raise money so as to not be too much of a burden on this young church plant in Thessalonica (vs9-10)

These are the types of attitudes and actions that can be expected of godly leadership.  Godly leaders are not perfect, but they are to represent Christ who was all of these things in the extreme.

There is no place for leaders in God’s church who are harsh, unloving, seeking-fame, unauthentic, aloof or self-serving.  Such characteristics ought to be lovingly challenged, repented of and turned away from.

Leaders get their marching orders from Jesus Christ who is the ultimate example of sacrificial love, authenticity and integrity and a gentleness that never compromised but always cared and loved for even the most unlovely.

Father God may we have more leaders who are like Jesus!

And may I/may we who are leaders always check & re-check our hearts!