Rich Application… (Philippians 4:1-7)

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“Therefore…” (vs1). With everything that’s been written already in this letter in your minds, ‘therefore’ – do the following things, live in the following way.

Deep community & love (vs1)
‘My brothers & sisters’ (NLT) – the New Testament and this letter, in particular, is littered with the language of relationship, deep community, love, shared experiences – family. Paul said he ‘loved and longed for’ the Philippians, there is deep affection on display. May we be provoked by this language, to not settle for mere crowds in our churches, or isolated disconnected people in our meetings. Such deep community and relationship require sacrifice and intentional investment of time. But such depth of relationship is exactly what Jesus desires (John 13:35 & John 17:22-23).

My joy and my crown (vs1)
God has connected the health of the members of a local church to the life of the leadership in a remarkable way. Paul clearly loves these Philippian believers and is joined to them at a heart level. They are a joy to him.

Paul knows that as a leader their steadfastness in following Christ in the midst of opposition is in some way connected to not just their eternal rewards but to his!

They are his crown and his future reward. His eternal future is intrinsically intertwined with their present steadfastness. And so when he urges them to remain steadfast, to do so benefits both the Philippian believers and Paul himself. So he urges them to keep standing firm.

Be Reconciled (vs2-3)
This disagreement or disunity was quite possibly the reason for the letter. Two significant women, two women who have laboured alongside the apostle Paul in the ministry of the Gospel are not seeing eye to eye. So Paul entreats/pleads/appeals that they desist and choose rather to ‘agree in the Lord’. Their disagreement is not just a private matter but is impacting the church and so one named ‘true companion/Syzygus’ is urged to intervene, to help them by mediating in their disagreement.

Rejoice always (vs4)
These two unsettled believers (vs2-3) are charged (as are all the believers in Philippi) to; ‘Rejoice in the Lord always’ (vs4). Sometimes when we are in some disagreement, all we can see is the issue or what they did or did not do. Paul urges them to lift their eyes to Jesus again, doing so brings perspective and transforms our hearts. The challenge of this command is the breadth of its application. ‘Always’ is the problem for us here. We have no problem rejoicing when something goes well for us, ‘rejoice always’ is code for; ‘rejoice even when things are not going well or according to your plan.’ It is only possible to obey this command by repeatedly meditating on Jesus and what He has done for us on the cross.

Let your reasonableness be known (vs5)
True unity and reconciliation are only possible when people choose to be reasonable/gentle/considerate. Once again there is one word which makes this hard for us – ‘everyone’.

It is easy to be nice to people who are nice to you, to be gentle when people are being helpful to you, to be considerate when people reciprocate your consideration of them.

It is much harder to be these things when those God has placed in our lives are not like this to us. Yet the motivation for our living like this is that the LORD is at hand.

So do not be anxious about anything, rather pray
Because the LORD’s second coming is imminent, and because God is an ever-present help in trouble we don’t have to be worried or anxious about anything in life but rather ought to pray calling out in every situation (vs6) to the One who loves us.

May the peace of God guard you (vs7)
As believers, we can access peace from God that makes no sense in the natural. We can know a peace that surpasses our understanding that will guard our hearts and minds in Jesus. Pray for yourself to know this sort of peace, let it shape your thinking in al you do.

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Who are you following & who’s following you? (Philippians 3:17-21)

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Having just described how he had abandoned all trust and pride in human lineage or achievements (vs1-7) so that he could place all his trust in Jesus Christ and progress in knowing Him better (vs7-11).

Paul then clarifies that he knows that he hasn’t arrived yet. He knows that he hasn’t finished his faith journey but is pressing on to lay hold of all that Jesus laid hold of him for (vs12-16).

Then he says some thing which can sound out of place to the modern ear; “Brothers, join in imitating me” (vs17).  

He urges the Philippian believers to imitate him in all that he has just described regarding his personal faith journey.

This is not the only place Paul says things like this;

  • Be imitators of me, as I am of Christ. (1 Corinthians 11:1)
  • to give you in ourselves an example to imitate. (2 Thessalonians 3:9)
  • What you have learned and received and heard and seen in me—practice these things, and the God of peace will be with you. (Philippians 4:9)

Paul unashamedly calls people to imitate his followership of Jesus. Essentially he says, imitate me, don’t be like those who ‘walk as enemies of the cross of Christ’ (vs18) who’s god is their desires, who glory in their shameful acts & who’s minds are fixated on earthly temporal things (vs18-19).

There are plenty of examples of people around us who deny the power of the cross. They live as though Jesus never died for them, they live as though Jesus is not the King of kings or that He ought to be loved, worshipped and obeyed.

As a result, such people live to satisfy their own desires and so celebrate whatever feels good to them regardless of how shameful such things might be. Because they deny the truth about God, they can only see the present (vs19b), but in so doing, they fail to see where the path they are on is leafing – destruction (vs19a).

Paul doesn’t want the Philippian believers; God doesn’t want you and I to be like such people. And so we are called to imitate Paul, to imitate his faith and his walk with Jesus.

All around us, people are looking for a sense of identity and belonging. But we who have believed in Jesus can be secure knowing that we belong already, that our identity was secured the moment we believed in Jesus.  

We who have believed in Jesus all have dual citizenship. We belong to the country of our birth or our adopted country & we are citizens of the kingdom of heaven (vs20).

This world, therefore, is not our home forever. We are visitors here; we are passing through. However, the best is yet to come. We have incredible hope in Jesus; we have something to live for! We belong to God and His kingdom.

We know that Jesus is coming back and His second coming will usher in a new era. There is a day when God will declare; ‘behold I am making all things new’ (Revelation 21:5) and that bright future is ours as believers in Jesus (vs20-21)

So don’t lose heart. Remember who you are and who’s you are. Remember that this life is just the dress rehearsal for the main event – eternity. Don’t undervalue eternity and in so doing make some monumentally bad decisions because your timeframe was way too short.

Find someone to imitate. We shouldn’t place people on pedestals but we ought to imitate the faith we see in others so that we can learn how to have robust faith and so that we don’t walk alone.

Who are you going to imitate? Why don’t you speak to someone today? Or who are you going to say; ‘imitate me’ to? Who are you going to invest your life and faith journey into? This doesn’t mean you’ve arrived, just that you have made some progress and if you want others to mentor you, you should be willing to mentor others too maybe.

God’s Delight (Psalm 18:1-19)

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‘I love You, O LORD, my strength’ (vs1)

What a relief, what joy to be able to declare that God is our strength! What a relief to not have to try to be strong, to not have to seek to hold it all together. Yahweh is our strength, and for that, we love Him (vs1)

Yahweh is our strength in that He is our rock, our strong, immovable foundation, Yahweh is our fortress the strong tower into which we can run and find refuge in times of danger. Yahweh is also a shield defending us from the attacks of the enemy (vs2).

Yahweh is my strength because He is the one I can call on and call out to for help (vs3) when desperate situations or challenges greater than my strength present themselves (vs4-5).

Yahweh is my strength because when I cry to Him, He hears and recognises my voice from His holy temple (vs6). And so my cries are not in vain.

Yahweh rips open the heavens to respond to my cries for help; He rides the wind and thunders on my behalf (vs7-19)!

And why does Yahweh act in such a way?

“He rescued me, because He delighted in me.” (vs19)

What astounding words. That the God of angel armies, the LORD most high, the Alpha and Omega delights in me! God takes pleasure in me in us.

I know myself. I know my limitations, my failings, my weakness and my sin, and yet You delight in me. Psalm 18:19 helps us to understand Hebrews 12:2 which explains the motivation in Jesus’ heart as He looked upon the cross;

Jesus, ‘who for the joy that was set before Him endured the cross, despising its shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God.” (Hebrews 12:2)

Psalm 18 depicts Jahweh his strength saving him from his temporal earthly enemies. But the great enemy and the greater eternal salvation for you and for me who have believed in Jesus is that we are saved eternally from our enemies of sin, shame, satan & death because of Jesus.

Why did Jahweh do this? Because He delighted in me, in us. Scripture is clear that it was God’s love for us that caused the Father to send the Son (John 3:16) so that He could have the joy of having us in heaven with Him forever and ever (Revelation 21:3).

LORD, thank you for choosing to love me, despite me, for loving me enough to send Jesus to make a way to cleanse me from my sin so that I would be in close relationship with you forever.

And if You did this massive thing in saving me, I am sure that there is nothing in this life, nothing on this earth that you will not rescue me from (Romans 8:32).

‘I love You, O LORD, my strength!’ (Psalm 18:1)

The Unequal Team (Philippians 2:12b-18)

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I love the glorious and unequal harmony of Philippians 2:12b-13. These precious verses reveal an unequal team that collaborates to accomplish something of great significance – our sanctification.

We are unequal partners, like a father and a small child in a rowing boat. We are partners. We each have an indispensable role and responsibility for progress. And yet our Father in heaven has the greater responsibility and commitment to our progress. 

We are to work out our life response to the good news of what God has done for us in Jesus – this is our responsibility (vs12b).

And yet we do so, knowing that God is working within us — working in the realm of our desires, causing us to want to live in such a way that we please God (vs13).

Both oars are in the water pulling, but we would never hope to make any progress if it were not for the work of God in our hearts changing our very desires so that we begin to want what God wants more and more.

On the back of this confidence that God is at work within every believer, Paul commands the Philippian believers to; “do all things without grumbling or disputing” (vs14). This is only possible through the enabling work of the Holy Spirit, changing us from the inside out.

We are to embrace life and life’s circumstances free from the quiet murmerings of discontent (‘grumbling’) and free from more public debate and arguments (‘disputes’). We are urged to live in such a way so that we might be blameless, known for our innocence as believers in Jesus – God’s children.

Merely seeking to work out obedience to this one command contained in vs14 will make us extra-ordinary people to those around us.  

Grumbling and moaning are like national sports in South Africa at the moment. But we are not to be like this as God’s children.

We are also to avoid public spats, disputes that do nothing to advance the cause of Christ. Social media posts and comments that have no real building potential come to mind.

We are to be those who shine amid great darkness, those who shine like stars amid a crooked and twisted generation. We are called to be different, to be holy as God enables us and places within us the desire to please Him.

We live this way by holding ‘fast to the word of life’ (vs16). God’s word is our road map, our guiding light as we navigate through life seeking to honour God in all we do as we work out our salvation with fear and trembling (vs12b).

Questions for Reflection:

  • How does seeing your role & God’s role in your sanctification in vs12b-13 change your understanding of progress in sanctification (becoming more and more like Jesus)?
  • Is there anything you have been grumbling about or disputing that you feel God is wanting to speak to you about from this passage? What is God saying He wants from you?
  • In what ways do you feel God wants you to shine amidist the darkness around you? What is God challenging you to do, or to stop doing so as to shine?

Foolish (Psalm 14)

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Foolishness is primarily a moral condition rather than a state of intellectual ability. There are some very bright fools out there!

Scripture declares in no uncertain terms that foolishness starts with denial. The fool is the person who says to themselves, the person who lives their life as if there is no God.

Wisdom starts with fearing God, and to know God results in insight (Proverbs 9:10). Therefore to declare that there is no God sentences the declarant to a state of folly since they cannot even start to have wisdom or understanding.

More than this, such a person’s denial of God and refusal to assign to God His rightful place in their lives and the world has devastating results. It leads to a corruption of their personhood and a downward spiral of their deeds.

This downward spiral is on display in Romans 1:18-32 where the truth about God is exchanged for a lie and so such people ‘claiming to be wise, they became fools…’ (vs22)

Wrong believing leads to wrong living, and right believing leads to right living.

May you and I always fear God and keep God in His rightful place in our lives. That’s the way to wisdom, may we never depart from it and may we continually pray that God would in His grace reveal Himself those who are currently denying the truth about God.

Unity, Love & Harmony (Philippians 2:1-11)

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Unity, harmony and love within the family of God (the Church) is not just a nice to have but essential!

Jesus said it like this; ‘by this will all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.’ (John 13:35).

When Paul thought of the Philippian believers and thought of what would make his joy in them complete (vs2) he urged them to do three things;
to agree, to be of one mind
to have the same love
to be harmonious (‘in full accord’) with one another

As believers, a family of faith, a gospel-community, Scripture urges us to be united in our thinking. Disunity of thought brings uncertainty in relationships and damages trust and the vulnerability that trust thrives on. But is such unity even possible?

Yes, it is! Unity is possible for those who have been included and encouraged in Christ. Unity is possible for those who are living in the power of the Holy Spirit. Unity is possible for those who have all experienced God’s love poured out into their hearts (vs2).

Unity without these shared experiences would be impossible, but within a gospel-community, it is possible; otherwise, Scripture would not command it.

More than this, gospel-communities are to be harmonious according to vs2. The Greek word translated ‘being in full accord’ (ESV) can also be translated ‘harmonious’.

Harmony is not the same as unity. By way of example, an orchestra is not an orchestra unless there is unity in diversity, not uniformity. Both unity and diversity are essential for there to be harmony. An orchestra’s beauty is its harmony of diverse instruments united one piece of music. It is having one conductor arranging their unique contributions in such a way that each contributes their unique sound, thus creating a beautiful harmony.

Gospel communities, likewise, are to be united but not uniform. They have a diversity of personality & gift but are united around one desire – to bring glory to Jesus Christ and to serve His mission in the world.

This was a passion in the heart of the apostle Paul, and thus, he makes this appeal to the Philippian believers urging them to be united and harmonious.

So what hinders unity and harmony? Its things like selfish ambition, pride (conceit). Such things ruin relationships and damage people and gospel-community.

Therefore, in the Church, let’s be those who humbly consider others more significant than ourselves. Let’s prefer others, be one another’s greatest fans and be very slow to posture or put ourselves forward (vs3).

Let’s also ensure that we are not selfishly looking after our interests but that we are considerate of the interests and needs of others seeking to serve others always (vs4).

What could possibly motivate us to act in these ways? There is only ONE; His name is Jesus! The single mind that we are all to have (vs2) is that we are all to have the mind of Jesus (vs5). We are to follow His example as He did not live selfishly or proudly but in humility, He came to serve you and me. Jesus, although He was God, emptied Himself taking the form of a servant (vs7), and humbled Himself to the point of death, death on a cross (vs8) for us!

He is our example; He is our motivation. He is the one we worship and live out our whole lives as a response.

Unity, love and harmony matter. But they are only possible when a gospel-community together fix their eyes on Jesus our great Saviour and example and live out their lives with one another as a response to Him.

Reflection:

  1. Ask God if there is any way you have been contributing to disunity in your gospel-community (Church)? Is there any way you have been acting selfishly, ambitiously or proudly? If the Holy Spirit shows you anything, then repent now of such things.
  2. Meditate again on what Jesus did for you (Philippians 2:5-11). What do you feel God is showing you about Jesus? What is God showing you that might need to change in your life?
  3. Ask the Holy Spirit to make you more and more ‘other-aware’, looking out not just for your interests but also the interests of others.

Dealing with Delay (Psalm 13)

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Delay is one of the hardest things to deal with as a believer in Jesus.

We don’t like delay. We tend to expect to a certain timing, and we don’t take kindly to that timing being extended.

So, maybe you can relate to the lyrics of the famous Queen song; 

“I want it all, I want it all, I want it all, and I want it now”.

What is it for you? How would you complete these sorts of sentences?

  • “I thought I/we would have….. by now”
  • “I can’t believe I still don’t have …….!”
  • “How long does ……… take?”

In this Psalm, David is lamenting a delay of some sort. He is at the end of his emotional and even physical reserves. The wait has nearly emptied him entirely (vs2-4).

His four-pronged question (“How long?”) is less a request for more information than it is an expression of his deeply-felt feelings.

Feelings are fickle! Does he really believe that God has forgotten him, does He now believe that the omniscient, omnipotent, omnipresent God has somehow lost sight of him, forgotten him? But it is how he feels. Does he really believe that God has hidden his face or that God wants him to be grovelling in the dust crying his days away – not caring?

Does he believe these things? Or is this how he feels when assaulted by the gap between his self-fashioned expectations and what has transpired?

I want a robust faith, not fickle feelings. In moments like these, when we are assaulted by the gap between our expectations and reality. Or when our emotions attack our faith – we need robust faith that is already in place.

It’s far too late when delay or trials come. We need an anchor for our emotions to hold us fast when they threaten.

Here in Psalm 13, despite David’s lament in vs1-2 what he believes to be true anchors him in the moment and pulls him through.  

He doesn’t really believe God has forgotten him or turned his back on him because then it would make no sense to pray out to God and to ask God to consider his plight and answer him (vs3).  

By vs5-6, the tone of the Psalm has changed already;

“But I have trusted in your steadfast love; my heart shall rejoice in your salvation. I will sing to the Lord, because he has dealt bountifully with me.”

Oh that you and I may invest deeply in our relationship with God, that we might grow in the depth of our knowledge of who He is and what He is like. May we grow in robust faith so that when the storms of delay or disappointment come, we will find ourselves anchored by that faith and so the storm in our heart and mind will subside replaced by trust in His unfailing love.